‘InSight’ man’s quest for life beyond earth | Sunday Observer

‘InSight’ man’s quest for life beyond earth

NASA lander survives harrowing descent to the surface of Mars
NASA lander survives harrowing descent to the surface of Mars

In a bid to find life beyond Earth and to assist the search for Earth-like exoplanets, NASA’s InSight Mars lander, launched on May 5, 2018 from the Vandenberg Air Force Base in California landed on Mars on November 26 as planned and has begun to explore the red planet.

Last Monday, November 26, InSight, the newest Mars lander of NASA got on Mars after a six-month voyage from Earth. InSight stands for “Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport”. The $850 million InSight mission, along with two fly-along cubesats called MarCO-A and MarCO-B, beamed data from the lander home to Earth during Monday’s touchdown.

Entering the space speedier than a high-velocity bullet, ‘InSight’ has been blessed enough to strike a perfect and safe landing on the Martian surface with the assistance of a parachute, heat-shield and rockets though it was an intense seven-minutes plunge that could even break the entire mission since it involved many risky manoeuvers.

After radioing a series of updates on the descent, the very first picture came out in fish eye view of the robot’s surroundings. Besides the surface mission in the prominence, this digging robot on Mars will make history by taking over the first mission to Mars focused on probing planet’s interior being the first interplanetary launch from the West Coast and the first outer space robotic explorer to study in-depth the inner space of Mars including its crust, mantle and core at the same time.

Having given birth to explore and study the Red Planet’s internal structure, InSight is equipped and projected accordingly with two cameras, a weather sensor, a retro-reflector, magnetometers and the Rotation and Interior Structure Experiment (RISE) to examine the Martian Interior for at least two years (one Martian year).

Deploying its solar panels was InSight’s first critical task. It’s set to be stationary, yet to drill the Martian surface 16 feet deep in search of replications to those who strive to see the worlds that resemble our own world. It will stay still and measure the properties of the Martian Interior with the seismic activity by studying the Marsquakes, evaluating the temperature through a heat flow experiment and by analyzing the size and the shape of its core by examining the wobbles as it orbits the sun.

As the Red Planet is under constant scrutiny over many years, being so close to the day it was formed, this time it would make a huge leap over all the previous numerous milestones that were added to history so far that made gradual progressions in reaching out to Mars that hides many mysteries that apply to the whole world.

By making comparisons between the interiors of Earth and Mars, the InSight team hopes to have a better understanding of our solar system. Even this study will assist to search for Earth-like exoplanets that are also capable of catering to life. Further, the study in-depth will provide answers to key questions pertaining to early formation of rocky planets in our inner solar system like that of the world we live in: Earth.

While plunging deep into the Red Planet’s interior, InSight carries out experiments on ‘deep space communication’ with the aid of the miniaturized ‘CubeSat Technology’ that involves mini satellites. In place of sound evidence and research experience, the scientists can make use of information by pulling them out for comparisons when better technology strikes out.

InSight will use its robotic arm to place both the heat probe and the seismometer suite directly on the Martian surface.

The mission team won’t be ready to do this for another two to three months, after they’ve studied InSight’s environs and using a testbed lander at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

When humans can’t resist exploring more and more, they won’t ever think of saying enough to what they know about the world. And this success has made its way too like that. As the saying reads, ‘to do science, we have to be bold and we have to be explorers’, there’s no ot

‘InSight’ man’s quest for life beyond earth Caption: NASA lander survives harrowing descent to the surface of Mars

Introduction: In a bid to find life beyond Earth and to assist the search for Earth-like exoplanets, NASA’s InSight Mars lander, launched on May 5, 2018 from the Vandenberg Air Force Base in California landed on Mars on November 26 as planned and has begun to explore the red planet.

Last Monday, November 26, InSight, the newest Mars lander of NASA got on Mars after a six-month voyage from Earth. InSight stands for “Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport”. The $850 million InSight mission, along with two fly-along cubesats called MarCO-A and MarCO-B, beamed data from the lander home to Earth during Monday’s touchdown.

Entering the space speedier than a high-velocity bullet, ‘InSight’ has been blessed enough to strike a perfect and safe landing on the Martian surface with the assistance of a parachute, heat-shield and rockets though it was an intense seven-minutes plunge that could even break the entire mission since it involved many risky manoeuvers.

After radioing a series of updates on the descent, the very first picture came out in fish eye view of the robot’s surroundings. Besides the surface mission in the prominence, this digging robot on Mars will make history by taking over the first mission to Mars focused on probing planet’s interior being the first interplanetary launch from the West Coast and the first outer space robotic explorer to study in-depth the inner space of Mars including its crust, mantle and core at the same time.

Having given birth to explore and study the Red Planet’s internal structure, InSight is equipped and projected accordingly with two cameras, a weather sensor, a retro-reflector, magnetometers and the Rotation and Interior Structure Experiment (RISE) to examine the Martian Interior for at least two years (one Martian year).

Deploying its solar panels was InSight’s first critical task. It’s set to be stationary, yet to drill the Martian surface 16 feet deep in search of replications to those who strive to see the worlds that resemble our own world. It will stay still and measure the properties of the Martian Interior with the seismic activity by studying the Marsquakes, evaluating the temperature through a heat flow experiment and by analyzing the size and the shape of its core by examining the wobbles as it orbits the sun.

- IP

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