Can you name these saltwater fish? | Sunday Observer

Can you name these saltwater fish?

Would you rather be a fish? Dive in and treat yourself to a fun and fishy five-minute challenge!

Marine habitats hold roughly 58% of all existing species of fish. Among them are some of the most unique-looking fish you will ever see. From hundreds of sharp teeth to extra long snouts, glowing sides to transparent heads, the marine waters are teeming with living proof of the diversity of life on the planet.

Some of these fish can be found in shallow coastal waters and others way down deep in the open seas - so deep that not even light from the sun can get to them and so deep that quite often humans actually know very little about them. There are quite a few which are familiar, such as the ones commonly used for food or hunted for sport. A number of them are also kept as pets in marine Aquariams. Are any of their names swimming around in your head? Get started and see if they made it into the quiz!

If getting to know marine life is a hobby of yours, then five minutes is plenty of time to name all of the fish we picked out for you. Jump right in - the quiz is fine!

 

1. This star of the Oscar-winning 1975 movie 'Jaws' is the most notorious predator in the oceans. Do you know its name?

*American harvestfish

*Great white shark

*Boxfish

*Atlantic blue marlin

2. This fish can inflate its body to up to three times its normal size. Which of these names does it go by?

*Shortbill spearfish

*Sunburst anthias

*Pufferfish

*Indo-Pacific sailfish

3. This serious-looking fish has an appropriate 'medical' name. Can you diagnose what it is?

*Lumpfish

*Surgeonfish

*Queen angelfish

*Barred sand bass

 

4. It's no joke that this fish shares a mutually beneficial relationship with sea anemone. Do you recognize it?

*Foureye butterflyfish

*Dash-and-dot goatfish

*Barberfish

*Common clown fish

 

5. If it looks like a snake and moves like a snake, it might just be the fish shown here? Can you name it?

*Whitemargin stargazer

*Black Marlin

*Northern red snapper

*Moray eel

 

6. It's not a bird or a plane but this fish certainly looks like it can fly. Do you know its name?

*Manta ray

*Tassled scorpionfish

*Sloane's viperfish

*Toadstool groper

 

Salt water Fish Answers

1: Great white shark

At 20 feet long and 4,000 pounds, the great white shark sits relatively unchallenged at the top of its food chain. It is a ferocious feeder with up to seven rows of teeth containing over 300 teeth in all. Only the killer whale (Orca) and larger sharks pose any kind of threat to the great white shark.

 

2: Pufferfish

Most species of pufferfish are considered to be highly poisonous. In fact, they are often ranked among the world's most dangerous fish, and its most dangerous animals. Pufferfish have tough skin and many also have prickles which are hidden until the fish puffs up.

 

3: Surgeonfish

The surgeonfish is named for the scalpel-like spines on either side of its tail. Dory, the fish with short-term memory loss in 'Finding Nemo' (2003), is a female surgeonfish. Luckily, real surgeonfish do not have Dory's memory problem!

 

4: Common Clown Fish

In their mutualistic relationship, the sea anemone's stinging tentacles ward off the common clown fish's predators. The clown fish in return rids the anemone of parasites and deters other fish from eating its tentacles. Most persons recognize the clown fish as the star of the 2003 Disney hit Finding Nemo.

5: Moray eel

Apart from its visible jaws, the moray eel has another set of jaws, complete with tiny teeth-like projections, hidden inside its body. It can bring this set forward to help it kill prey held by the outer jaws. The inner jaws also help to pull the food into the eel's body for digestion.

6: Manta ray

There are two types of manta ray: the familiar giant oceanic manta ray and the lesser-known reef manta ray. Like other rays, the manta ray has a flat body and fins which have evolved to look like wings, giving the impression that the manta ray is flying through the water.

 

 

 

Comments