Republic of Booza's stretchy ice cream | Sunday Observer

Republic of Booza's stretchy ice cream

Always wished you could savour your ice cream slowly, without the treat turning into a sticky, melted mess? Then you may want to stop by the Republic of Booza in Brooklyn, New York, for a scoop or two of Booza — a stretchy, taffy-like ice-cream that not only lasts longer but is also best consumed twirled around a fork!

The creamy frozen treat's origin can be traced back over 500 years to the Eastern Mediterranean's Levant region, which includes modern-day Palestine, Israel, and Syria. Like most ice creams, Booza comprises three basic ingredients — milk, cream and sugar.

However, instead of eggs to enhance creaminess and increase the ice cream's stability, the ancient recipe uses the sap from the mastic tree.

Cornstarch, which acts as a thickener in most conventional recipes, is replaced by ground orchid root, or Sahlab.

Also, instead of churning the concoction slowly to remove air, the mix is pounded with a wooden mallet and then pulled, stretched, and twirled around like pizza dough.

The result is a frozen treat which extends out like mozzarella cheese and is smoother and creamier than most other ice creams.

Also, unlike regular ice creams that are best between -4°F (-20°Ç) and 5°F (-15°C), Booza remains stable at 12°F (-11°C) to 15°F (-9°C). According to the company's website, this allows the treat to be served at temperatures that bring out its full flavour and intensity.

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