Armed Forces Remembrance Day | Sunday Observer

Armed Forces Remembrance Day

The traditional pinning of the First Poppy on the Commander-in-Chief took place at the Presidential Secretariat. Here, President Maithripala Sirisena is flanked by the President of SLESA, Major General Upul Perera, Chairman of the Armed Forces Remembrance Day, Poppy Commemoration and Cenotaph Development Committee, Rear Admiral Dr. Shemal Fernando and the Secretary General of SLESA, Lieutenant Colonel Ajith Siyambalapitiya.
The traditional pinning of the First Poppy on the Commander-in-Chief took place at the Presidential Secretariat. Here, President Maithripala Sirisena is flanked by the President of SLESA, Major General Upul Perera, Chairman of the Armed Forces Remembrance Day, Poppy Commemoration and Cenotaph Development Committee, Rear Admiral Dr. Shemal Fernando and the Secretary General of SLESA, Lieutenant Colonel Ajith Siyambalapitiya.

The Armed Forces Remembrance Day organised by the Sri Lanka Ex-Servicemen’s Association (SLESA) will be held at the Cenotaph (War Memorial) at Vihara Maha Devi Park, Colombo 7 on November 10 with the participation of War Veterans and representations from the Army, Navy and the Air Force.

The ceremony is coordinated by the Chief of Defence Staff, Admiral Ravi Wijegunarathne on behalf of the SLESA. This year’s Poppy Campaign launched on August 15 is in full swing across the country and all Sri Lankans are invited to buy a Poppy Wreath or a Poppy Sticker and contribute towards the wellbeing of the Ex-Servicemen.

On November 11, 1918, came the ceasefire of the First World War. Annually, Sri Lanka commemorates the heroes of WW I and WW II as well as those gallant men and women who made the Supreme Sacrifice in the 30 year conflict that engulfed Sri Lanka. It was the end of WW I which had cost the then British Empire and its allies millions of lives and the enemy many millions more. In this background, November 11 was adopted as the ‘Day of Remembrance’ for the fallen in that war and in the years between the First and Second World Wars.

At the close of the World War II, November 11 became the ‘Day of Remembrance’ for the dead of both WW I and WW II.

For many years afterwards, Armistice Day was observed on November 11, but now, it is held on the Sunday nearest to November 11.

 

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